V3 Movement

Training

Developing New Competencies
V3 Movement

Training

Developing New Competencies

Planting
Cohort

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Re-Missioning
Cohort

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MarketPlace
Cohort

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Intercultural
Cohort

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Specialized
Coaching

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Planting
Cohort

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Re-Missioning
Cohort

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MarketPlace
Cohort

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Intercultural
Cohort

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Specialized
Coaching

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Church Planting Cohorts

Church Planting Cohorts

 
 
Why Cohorts?
Research shows that church planters who engage in an in-depth training experience, alongside experienced coaches, are more likely to succeed in their efforts at church planting. This is why every church that partners with V3 participates in learning cohorts (LC). Most Church Planters are trained in how to draw a crowd and preach a good sermon, but few have been equipped for the future the church is facing. Many are starving for guidance and grounded tools on how to cultivate movemental types of church bodies. Our training is holistic, communal, peer-based, and practice oriented.
 

Engaging Cohort
(Year One)

If you are in the pre-plant phase, or are a new plant (within the first three years) then this is your learning cohort. In every endeavor, in every field, knowing and practicing the basics is integral to success. This is a 30 week cohort that will partner you up with 5 to 7 other church planters and an experienced coach. Together you will take the journey from the last week of August to late April in learning the grassroots work of movement. This learning cohort is a per-requisite for partnering and receiving grants from V3. You must have a working knowledge of these competencies before moving forward. This is designed for a planter or co-planters.

  • The 8 Competencies of Movement (underneath this heading we'd like a similar layout as what's here on our beta site, scroll down under the 8 competencies for missional church planting.

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Establishing Cohort 
(Year Two)

For those who graduate from Engaging (Year One) we offer a deep dive in Establishing. Moving toward knowing the basics instinctively as you go deeper in each of the eight competencies learned in year one. Year Two's training elevates the level of peer-to-peer learning, allowing planters to experiment in leading coaching calls. Your coach will help you look at these eight themes and competencies with your team and context in mind. This final year of training is designed for a planter and/or co-planters.

Image

Engaging Cohort
(Year One)

If you are in the pre-plant phase, or are a new plant (within the first three years) then this is your learning cohort. In every endeavor, in every field, knowing and practicing the basics is integral to success. This is a 30 week cohort that will partner you up with 5 to 7 other church planters and an experienced coach. Together you will take the journey from the last week of August to late April in learning the grassroots work of movement. This learning cohort is a pre-requisite for partnering and receiving grants from V3. You must have a working knowledge of these competencies before moving forward. This is designed for a planter or co-planters.

  • The 8 Competencies of Movement (underneath this heading we'd like a similar layout as what's here on our beta site, scroll down under the 8 competencies for missional church planting.

Learn More


Establishing Cohort 
(Year Two)

Image

For those who graduate from Engaging (Year One), we offer a deep dive in Establishing. Moving toward knowing the basics instinctively as you go deeper in each of the eight competencies learned in year one. Year Two's training elevates the level of peer-to-peer learning, allowing planters to experiment in leading coaching calls. Your coach will help you look at these eight themes and competencies with your team and context in mind. This final year of training is designed for a planter and/or co-planters.

 

Re-Missioning
Cohort

Re-Missioning
Cohort

 

“If western societies have become post-Christian mission fields, how can traditional churches become then missionary churches?” ~ Lesslie Newbigin

“Leadership is energizing a community of people toward their own transformation in order to accomplish a shared mission together.” ~  Tod Bolsinger

Many churches in the United States have either stopped growing or are in decline. Yet, what is more concerning is the drift away from following Christ deeper into their local places on mission. We meet leaders regularly who are awakening to this. They have personally experienced a theological and missiological transition in their own souls. They know the church, their own church, is in need of revitalization. But they find themselves challenged in how to help their church make this transition without blowing it up. We've gathered genuine practitioners who have experienced the hard work of Re-Missioning their established church. Do you want to re-calibrate your church around missional presence? Do you face old policies and outdate procedures that prevent this? Do you long to honor the past while innovating towards the future?

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The Experience: A weekly group coaching call with a cohort of Re-Missioners facilitated by Josh Hayden. A three-day training with the V3 Movement at the Praxis Gathering in Philadelphia. One session with a Spiritual Director. Support and Resources from the larger V3 Movement Tribe. Optional Self-care Retreat in Malibu.

Re-Missioning Cohort 7 Competencies

1. A Spirituality of Weakness
Leadership that acknowledges limits and the habits of cruciform influence. Seeking to be a disciple before making disciples.

2. Creative Destruction
Learning how to put the narrative of life, death, and resurrection into real-time practice. Engaging the existing systems and culture of a local body with intentional disruption.

3. Cultural Assessment
Identifying the gaps and resources of a current established community. Charting a strategic path over the gap into the landscape of transformation.

4. Purposeful Pruning
Recognizing every event, ritual, program, and tradition ultimately shapes a churches mission. Discover thoughtful habits of pruning so that a gathering of people can bear good fruit again.

5. Traditioned Innovation
Holding the past and future in creative tension and learning to live more fulling in the present activity of God. Listening to what the Spirit is stirring up in local place and responding.

6. Ecclesial Architecture
Organizing your teams, groups, and committees around a framework of movemental discipleship rather than duties for service. Guiding each social space into spiritual formation.

7. Shared Experiments
Utilizing time bound experiences as pathways into neighboring, missional living, and the discovery of 5-fold gifts. These experiments break open space for new imagination in stale contexts.

Re-Missioning
Cohort

Re-Missioning
Cohort

Image

“If western societies have become post-Christian mission fields, how can traditional churches become then missionary churches?” ~ Lesslie Newbigin

“Leadership is energizing a community of people toward their own transformation in order to accomplish a shared mission together.” ~  Tod Bolsinger

Many churches in the United States have either stopped growing or are in decline. Yet, what is more concerning is the drift away from following Christ deeper into their local places on mission. We meet leaders regularly who are awakening to this. They have personally experienced a theological and missiological transition in their own souls. They know the church, their own church, is in need of revitalization. But they find themselves challenged in how to help their church make this transition without blowing it up. We've gathered genuine practitioners who have experienced the hard work of Re-Missioning their established church. Do you want to re-calibrate your church around missional presence? Do you face old policies and outdate procedures that prevent this? Do you long to honor the past while innovating towards the future?

The Experience: A weekly group coaching call with a cohort of Re-Missioners facilitated by Josh Hayden. A three-day training with the V3 Movement at the Praxis Gathering in Philadelphia. One session with a Spiritual Director. Support and Resources from the larger V3 Movement Tribe. Optional Self-care Retreat in Malibu.

 

Re-Missioning Cohort 7 Competencies

1. A Spirituality of Weakness
Leadership that acknowledges limits and the habits of cruciform influence. Seeking to be a disciple before making disciples.

2. Creative Destruction
Learning how to put the narrative of life, death, and resurrection into real-time practice. Engaging the existing systems and culture of a local body with intentional disruption.

3. Cultural Assessment
Identifying the gaps and resources of a current established community. Charting a strategic path over the gap into the landscape of transformation.

4. Purposeful Pruning
Recognizing every event, ritual, program, and tradition ultimately shapes a churches mission. Discover thoughtful habits of pruning so that a gathering of people can bear good fruit again.

5. Traditioned Innovation
Holding the past and future in creative tension and learning to live more fulling in the present activity of God. Listening to what the Spirit is stirring up in local place and responding.

6. Ecclesial Architecture
Organizing your teams, groups, and committees around a framework of movemental discipleship rather than duties for service. Guiding each social space into spiritual formation.

7. Shared Experiments
Utilizing time bound experiences as pathways into neighboring, missional living, and the discovery of 5-fold gifts. These experiments break open space for new imagination in stale contexts.

MarketPlace
Cohort

MarketPlace
Cohort

 

“Believers participate in Christ’s priesthood not within the walls of the Church but in the daily business of the world.”   Leslie Newbigin

There is a seismic shift in American culture, the church now finds itself in increasing irrelevance in its “come to us” posture. The Church is invited to break down the sacred/secular divide by creating sustainable missional faith-communities while providing services and relational connection to local neighborhoods. This is where Mission and the Market can converge in context.

As early Trappists Monks in the 1600’s created enterprises to fund their sacred calling, so today’s marketplace planters and pioneers will artistically find ways to start businesses that contribute social good and while gaining favor in the civic structures of a particular place.

“Believers participate in Christ’s priesthood not within the walls of the Church but in the daily business of the world.”   Leslie Newbigin

There is a seismic shift in American culture, the church now finds itself in increasing irrelevance in its “come to us” posture. The Church is invited to break down the sacred/secular divide by creating sustainable missional faith-communities while providing services and relational connection to local neighborhoods. This is where Mission and the Market can converge in context.

As early Trappists Monks in the 1600’s created enterprises to fund their sacred calling, so today’s marketplace planters and pioneers will artistically find ways to start businesses that contribute social good and while gaining favor in the civic structures of a particular place.

Image

The Experience: A monthly group coaching call with a cohort of MarketPlace Planters. An on-time Coach (Hugh Halter) for spontaneous coaching during the week. A two-day immersion in Alton, Ohio with Hugh. A three-day training with the V3 Movement at the Praxis Gathering in Philadelphia. Support and Resources from the larger V3 Movement Tribe.

MarketPlace Planting Cohort 7 Competencies

1. Missiological Foundations
Exegeting the city/community you are called to in order to determine the best business to bless the neighborhood. Listening to what God is doing and discerning how to respond.

2. Making Disciples
Building a team of Trappists rather than being a solo hero. Raising up a Discipleship-core who are sent together. APEST team formation for both business and ministry context becomes the hot-center for movement.

3. Business Acumen
The ability to balance the relational & redemptive elements of the gospel with the bottom-line realities of starting and sustaining a viable business. What Capital and Funding realities should you consider? You will be coached on creating a business plan.

4. Dragnet Formation
Learn Civic integration into the fabric of a local place. Establish street cred for the Common Good. Develop a network for micro ventures (business/relational/discipleship) in which an expression of faith is birthed from.

5. Churching the Mission
Learn when and how to gather the church that God is forming. Rhythms must be discerned and decided to form a tight-knit community for mission. When do we worship? What does worship look like?

6. Trappist Soul Practices
Entrepreneurial spiritual formation and practices. Being a Disciple that is emotionally and spiritually healthy cannot be neglected or we will burn out or bully others in our work.

7. Apostolic Energy
Learn where a leader spends their time, energy, and focus. The management of your capacities for long term faithfulness is important. How do you enjoy the process while living in the go-go stage? How do you live into movement rather than mere survival?

MarketPlace
Cohort

MarketPlace
Cohort

Image

“Believers participate in Christ’s priesthood not within the walls of the Church but in the daily business of the world.”   Leslie Newbigin

There is a seismic shift in American culture, the church now finds itself in increasing irrelevance in its “come to us” posture. The Church is invited to break down the sacred/secular divide by creating sustainable missional faith-communities while providing services and relational connection to local neighborhoods. This is where Mission and the Market can converge in context.

As early Trappists Monks in the 1600’s created enterprises to fund their sacred calling, so today’s marketplace planters and pioneers will artistically find ways to start businesses that contribute social good and while gaining favor in the civic structures of a particular place.

“Believers participate in Christ’s priesthood not within the walls of the Church but in the daily business of the world.”   Leslie Newbigin

There is a seismic shift in American culture, the church now finds itself in increasing irrelevance in its “come to us” posture. The Church is invited to break down the sacred/secular divide by creating sustainable missional faith-communities while providing services and relational connection to local neighborhoods. This is where Mission and the Market can converge in context.

As early Trappists Monks in the 1600’s created enterprises to fund their sacred calling, so today’s marketplace planters and pioneers will artistically find ways to start businesses that contribute social good and while gaining favor in the civic structures of a particular place.

The Experience: A monthly group coaching call with a cohort of MarketPlace Planters. An on-time Coach (Hugh Halter) for spontaneous coaching during the week. A two-day immersion in Alton, Ohio with Hugh. A three-day training with the V3 Movement at the Praxis Gathering in Philadelphia. Support and Resources from the larger V3 Movement Tribe.

 

MarketPlace Planting Cohort 7 Competencies

1. Missiological Foundations
Exegeting the city/community you are called to in order to determine the best business to bless the neighborhood. Listening to what God is doing and discerning how to respond.

2. Making Disciples
Building a team of Trappists rather than being a solo hero. Raising up a Discipleship-core who are sent together. APEST team formation for both business and ministry context becomes the hot-center for movement.

3. Business Acumen
The ability to balance the relational & redemptive elements of the gospel with the bottom-line realities of starting and sustaining a viable business. What Capital and Funding realities should you consider? You will be coached on creating a business plan.

4. Dragnet Formation
Learn Civic integration into the fabric of a local place. Establish street cred for the Common Good. Develop a network for micro ventures (business/relational/discipleship) in which an expression of faith is birthed from.

5. Churching the Mission
Learn when and how to gather the church that God is forming. Rhythms must be discerned and decided to form a tight-knit community for mission. When do we worship? What does worship look like?

6. Trappist Soul Practices
Entrepreneurial spiritual formation and practices. Being a Disciple that is emotionally and spiritually healthy cannot be neglected or we will burn out or bully others in our work.

7. Apostolic Energy
Learn where a leader spends their time, energy, and focus. The management of your capacities for long term faithfulness is important. How do you enjoy the process while living in the go-go stage? How do you live into movement rather than mere survival?

Intercultural Movemental Cohort

MarketPlace
Cohort

 

“Our goal is to create a beloved community and this will require a qualitative change in our souls as well as a quantitative change in our lives.” – Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

“My hope isn’t that we change the social order but instead that, like Jesus and his disciples, we build small cadres of the Beloved Community that can infiltrate society and change it from the inside out.” – Rev. Dr. Brenda Salter McNeil

Local neighborhoods across the world are more globalized than ever. In the US, by 2045 there will be no racial-ethnic majority. In the US and globally, the wealth gap between the rich and the poor is greater than ever, disproportionately along racial lines. The Church in the West has too often served the interests of the dominant class reinforcing rather than resisting and creating alternatives to these realities of division and disparity. Churches continue to be one of the most segregated institutions along the lines of race and class. How might a missional movement of beloved communities be an alternative and conspire for change amidst the conditions facing our neighborhoods?

Drawing from the wisdom of intercultural missional movements led by people of color and poor people in the US and Global South, this cohort will equip participants to build intercultural relationships and attend to disparities at the root to plant a network of beloved communities that walk humbly, love mercy, and do justice as a witness to the gospel.

“Believers participate in Christ’s priesthood not within the walls of the Church but in the daily business of the world.”   Leslie Newbigin

There is a seismic shift in American culture, the church now finds itself in increasing irrelevance in its “come to us” posture. The Church is invited to break down the sacred/secular divide by creating sustainable missional faith-communities while providing services and relational connection to local neighborhoods. This is where Mission and the Market can converge in context.

As early Trappists Monks in the 1600’s created enterprises to fund their sacred calling, so today’s marketplace planters and pioneers will artistically find ways to start businesses that contribute social good and while gaining favor in the civic structures of a particular place.

Image

The Experience: A weekly group coaching call with a cohort of Planters facilitated by Brandon Wrencher. A three-day training with the V3 Movement at the Praxis Gathering in Philadelphia. Support and Resources from the larger V3 Movement Tribe. Optional Self-care Retreat in Malibu.

Planting Beloved Communities Cohort 7 Competencies

1. Missiological Foundations
Build common ground on Scripture’s vision of beloved community and the habits needed to co-create with God beloved communities in your place.

2. Intercultural Competence
Learn the differences between multicultural, cross-cultural, and intercultural ministry, including analysis of how power functions in relationships and systems. Engage your own social location in order to become a better ally to your neighbors and those with whom you desire to build community.

3. Faith-Rooted Social Justice
Learn about the history of faith-rooted intercultural missional movements led by people of color and poor people in the US. Interrogate different theories of change, how they functioned in these movements, and how to utilize them in building your network of beloved communities.

4. Community Organizing
Develop skills to listen for the deep needs, assets, and callings for bringing people together in local neighborhoods to build beloved communities and create change through strategies such as social enterprises, community development, nonviolent direct action, education, and direct service.

5. Leader-full Environment
Reflect on your call story and its connection to the APEST leadership model in Ephesians with democratic and consensus models of decision-making to build an abundance of leaders in your beloved communities and neighborhood ministries.

6. Participatory Spiritual Practices
Cultivate missional and intercultural liturgical and contemplative practices that help your beloved communities sustain their souls and build a culture of celebration.

7. Relational Infrastructure
Design basic logistics and processes that are highly relational as a foundation that allows for your beloved communities to be nimble and adaptive for multiplication and movement.

Intercultural Movemental Cohort

Intercultural Movemental Cohort

Image

“Our goal is to create a beloved community and this will require a qualitative change in our souls as well as a quantitative change in our lives.” – Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

“My hope isn’t that we change the social order but instead that, like Jesus and his disciples, we build small cadres of the Beloved Community that can infiltrate society and change it from the inside out.” – Rev. Dr. Brenda Salter McNeil

Local neighborhoods across the world are more globalized than ever. In the US, by 2050 there will be no racial-ethnic majority. In the US and globally, the wealth gap between the rich and the poor is greater than ever, disproportionately along racial lines. The Church in the West has too often served the interests of the dominant class reinforcing rather than resisting and creating alternatives to these realities of division and disparity. Churches continue to be one of the most segregated institutions along the lines of race and class. How might a missional movement of beloved communities be an alternative and conspire for change amidst the conditions facing our neighborhoods?

Drawing from the wisdom of intercultural missional movements led by people of color and poor people in the US and Global South, this cohort will equip participants to build intercultural relationships and attend to disparities at the root to plant a network of beloved communities that walk humbly, love mercy, and do justice as a witness to the gospel.

“Our goal is to create a beloved community and this will require a qualitative change in our souls as well as a quantitative change in our lives.” – Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

“My hope isn’t that we change the social order but instead that, like Jesus and his disciples, we build small cadres of the Beloved Community that can infiltrate society and change it from the inside out.” – Rev. Dr. Brenda Salter McNeil

Local neighborhoods across the world are more globalized than ever. In the US, by 2045 there will be no racial-ethnic majority. In the US and globally, the wealth gap between the rich and the poor is greater than ever, disproportionately along racial lines. The Church in the West has too often served the interests of the dominant class reinforcing rather than resisting and creating alternatives to these realities of division and disparity. Churches continue to be one of the most segregated institutions along the lines of race and class. How might a missional movement of beloved communities be an alternative and conspire for change amidst the conditions facing our neighborhoods?

Drawing from the wisdom of intercultural missional movements led by people of color and poor people in the US and Global South, this cohort will equip participants to build intercultural relationships and attend to disparities at the root to plant a network of beloved communities that walk humbly, love mercy, and do justice as a witness to the gospel.

The Experience: A weekly group coaching call with a cohort of Planters facilitated by Brandon Wrencher. A three-day training with the V3 Movement at the Praxis Gathering in Philadelphia. Support and Resources from the larger V3 Movement Tribe. Optional Self-care Retreat in Malibu.

 

Planting Beloved Communities Cohort 7 Competencies

1. Missiological Foundations
Build common ground on Scripture’s vision of beloved community and the habits needed to co-create with God beloved communities in your place.

2. Intercultural Competence
Learn the differences between multicultural, cross-cultural, and intercultural ministry, including analysis of how power functions in relationships and systems. Engage your own social location in order to become a better ally to your neighbors and those with whom you desire to build community.

3. Faith-Rooted Social Justice
Learn about the history of faith-rooted intercultural missional movements led by people of color and poor people in the US. Interrogate different theories of change, how they functioned in these movements, and how to utilize them in building your network of beloved communities.

4. Community Organizing
Develop skills to listen for the deep needs, assets, and callings for bringing people together in local neighborhoods to build beloved communities and create change through strategies such as social enterprises, community development, nonviolent direct action, education, and direct service.

5. Leader-full Environment
Reflect on your call story and its connection to the APEST leadership model in Ephesians with democratic and consensus models of decision-making to build an abundance of leaders in your beloved communities and neighborhood ministries.

6. Participatory Spiritual Practices
Cultivate missional and intercultural liturgical and contemplative practices that help your beloved communities sustain their souls and build a culture of celebration.

7. Relational Infrastructure
Design basic logistics and processes that are highly relational as a foundation that allows for your beloved communities to be nimble and adaptive for multiplication and movement.

Specialized Coaching

Specialized Coaching

 
 

The challenges of ministry bring to the surface all kinds of questions, fears, and inadequacies that get buried deep within us. We don't want you to do it alone. Studies continue to reveal that leaders and teams who participate in coaching are more effective and exhibit long-term vitality. We provide church planters, pastors, and ministry teams guidance, direction, development, and methodology for their unique missional context.

 

Personal Coaching - $179 (this includes three 75-minute sessions)

Personal, contextualized coaching centered on one of the Specialized Coaching Competencies. This is for a church planter, pastor, or missional leader who wants to grow in this particular competency, process concrete hurdles, and deepen their leadership.

Team Coaching - $199 (this includes three 75-minute sessions)

Team, contextualized coaching centered on one of the Specialized Coaching Competences. This is for any elder or missional team that wants to deepen in a particular competency, strengthen the health of their team, and lead more faithfully together.

The Current Competencies We Offer:

  • Soul Care for Kingdom Leaders
  • Creating a Discipleship Pathway
  • 5-Fold (APEST) Ministry for Teams
  • Personal Spiritual Direction
  • The Enneagram in Context
 

Formational Approach

We don’t want to just transfer information and best ideas. When we converge weekly we seek a formational pathway for engaging the mind, soul, and body. We engage these three parts of our identity though three specific concepts.

Meta-learning (Mind) is the effort of exposing a learner’s mind to a new reality through information that brings awakening. A meta-moment happens when you stumble across something that captures you and gets the gears of your mind moving in new ways. Every week we will ask you to record and share your Meta.

Reflective-learning (Soul) is the effort of excavating deeper learning through good questions. It’s taking a magnifying glass to explore what’s below the surface. Every week we will invite you to reflect on and record what brings you conflict, clarity or confusion.

Experiential-learning (Body) is the effort of creating fresh learning in the  body through local practice; taking active steps. You see, true learning doesn’t take place until we do something with it. We must not be afraid to try, to make bold attempts and fail. Weekly you will record your next step in application.

 

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V3 is the national church planting movement of the The General Association. (GA).

Contact us at info@thev3movement.org

V3 is the national church planting movement of the The General Association. (GA).